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Creating a Great Corporate Culture: Part 1-Physical Work Environment

Sure, we have all seen pictures and videos of the infamous Google Complex out in sunny California. The endless stretches of glass, the flashes of blues, reds, yellows, and greens, and of course, the impossibly cool lounge areas and conference rooms—but does this amazing physical work environment result in a great company culture?

The answer is no – well, not by itself. While trendy offices tend to offer higher curb appeal than drab ones, the physical environment is not necessarily what creates the energy needed for an exciting corporate culture. However, it can be the catalyst that sparks interaction, collaboration, and communication—three crucial elements in a growing company.

Greg Schott, the CEO of MuleSoft, a growing technology integration company out of San Francisco, is a huge proponent of corporate culture, and his insights will be featured often throughout this blog series.

“… The physical work environment is symbolic of how a company is thinking about the importance of their people and the workplace,” Schott said in Episode 20 of The Future of Work Podcast, “There can be great energy anywhere, but it [the physical environment] is indicative of a management team thinking of their people first.”

One of the most important elements in creating a dynamic corporate culture is belief: belief in the management team, belief in the vision of the company, and belief in the work that is being produced by that company. That belief is what helps you form your employer brand—in other words, the way you market your company to potential employees. Perhaps it could stem from the physical environment. Does your work space promote interaction, or collaboration? Is it an exciting place to come work day in and day out? Does it look like the management team puts an effort into promoting a comfortable work environment? These are some of the questions to ask when you are creating that physical office space.

However, that office also needs to be filled with people that are a good cultural fit, so tailor the office space to attract the type of minds that fit the vision of the company. A more open, collaborative environment might attract employees that thrive in team-oriented organizations, while an office with closed doors and isolation might attract employees that are more introverted and individualist. One isn’t necessarily better than the other, but it is important that the office space supports the talent you want to attract.

Culture is cultivated in the physical workspace. The office space may not be the most important aspect of creating your corporate culture, but it is a physical symbol of the vision and direction of a company that can attract the talent you need to take your company to the next level.

Want to learn more about creating a great corporate culture? Visit our Talent Acquisition Consulting Solutions page to learn how ORS can define and locate the talent you need.

 

Written By: Christopher Eberhardt